Although the reason why is not not clear, some people who have hay fever find that their symptoms abate as they get older. However, that does not mean that the reverse can’t happen; other people find that their allergies are more difficult to deal with as they age. There have also been individuals that report getting hay fever as an older adult, even though they never had difficulty with pollen in the past.

No one knows why adults seem to suddenly develop allergies, particularly when they did not have any symptoms as children. Why could you spend hours playing outside in the spring, with pollen swirling around you, when now you can barely go outside when the weather starts to warm up? While we don’t know why, we do know that this phenomenon occurs at any age. And, there are more people affected now than ever before. Why is this the case?

Studies show that after menopause in women, the nasal hairs function differently in women. They do not beat as often, which means that mucus, allergens and more can find their way into the upper throat and nasal cavities. In addition, because there is less estrogen in the nasal cavity tissue, the area is harder and not as flexible.

Later in life, the area of your nose that keeps your nostrils separate starts to retract. The end of your nose moves slightly downward. It is possible that when this starts to happen, there is less airflow in the nose and more issues with rhinitis, otherwise known as hay fever according to The Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology Journal printed an article on this topic.

There are several theories about why allergy symptoms are becoming more common in older adults. Some think it is because we are not active enough. Others point to the food that we eat or the fact that there is not as much ventilation in our living spaces. Still others think it has to do with more dust mites or more airborne pollutants.

Some people think it’s because we are too clean and have wiped out the ability to fight certain bacteria. Our immune systems are not as strong as a result, making us more susceptible to allergies.

Adults that have issues with allergies may have had an episode in their childhood that they are unable to recall. Most food allergies and eczema are present in the very young. Hay fever is often present sometime during childhood. Teenagers are typically given some relief from allergies, but then the issues can crop back up later in life.

If you experience symptoms that you think could be related to an allergy, get in touch with your primary care physician and discuss any issues you are experiencing. Be sure to know exactly what medications you are taking, so you can pass that information on to the medical professionals who are treating you.

Bob Grobe is the president of Healthy Living Products and has been helping people across the globe to enjoy improved health and a higher quality of life for more than 40 years. His blog at HealthyLivingProducts.com is filled with information about healthy living and its advantages.